Archive for June, 2016


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By Trent Tibbitts

Growing up on the banks of the Raccoon Creek,  I had often wondered where the waters went. I knew that they flowed north and entered the Etowah River some 10 miles away.  But how did they get there and what was it like along the way.  From a young age I wanted to make this trip.  I have made it a goal to travel the entire length of the Raccoon Creek and to eventually follow the waterway to the Gulf of Mexico.  But one step at a time.  I have covered most of Raccoon Creek, only needing to complete the uper most section of  a few miles.  However, I was able to complete a large portion of Raccoon Creek with a canoe trip from our property at the Ford, all the way to the Etowah River.

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It was Saturday  May 28, 2016, Memorial day weekend. We had a party at the creek  for Wyatt who had just graduated from North Paulding High School. Being a three day weekend,  I wanted to take advantage of the time I had. John had been at the party all day and had helped setup.  His wife and kids had plans for the night so he was free to do whatever. I told John that I wanted to canoe down the creek to the Etowah.  He was up for it. The party wrapped up around 7 PM. It took about an hour to get everything together and in the boat. We both keep our backpacks packed and ready.  John gathered his supplies, emergency food and clothing. I took an extra MRE. We weren’t sure how long we would be gone. I then loaded a cooler with leftover ice, drinks, uncooked  hamburgers and hotdogs. I had the bread, pop tarts for breakfast, candy and a few ofher things in grocery bags under the seats. I put my portable gas grill in the back of the boat. I was sitting in the back with the cooler between my  legs.  Both packs were in the middle and John was in the front seat. I was trying to video document the trip,  so after a short video, we were off.

We launched at the camper right below the Ford.  I quickly realized that I didn’t have my sunglasses. We stopped at John’s Pavilion and I ran back to get them. Good thing, I had left the camper door open. I ran back to the waiting boat and we were off again. The creek water level was down some. One indicator of how much water is flowing is if any water is running over the road or not. There wasn’t any water flowing over the road, all of it was going through the pipes. This made the shoals difficult to navigate.  We were able to push our way through some if the waters were to one side of the creek. Often this ment we were right next to the bank and the low hanging tree limbs. John cleared the spider webs out for me.  If the waters were wide going over the shoals,  it would only be a few inches deep and we would have to get out and pull the boat along. Most of the time we would keep walking until the water got up to our knees. Just below John’s Pavilion is a small stream flowing into the creek from papa Hollis Tibbitts original Lake.  The stream forms the land line between John and Carlton. We paddled past Carlton’s place and to the Poky hole.  A favorite swimming hole of my youth.  It is a small rock ledge named after a female slave of the McGregor’s who were the first white settlers to live here. Papa Hollis Tibbitts was baptised here. A few hundred feet on down is the remnants of a cable Crossing.  The inspiration for my zip line across the creek at the camper.  Only a few dozen feet on down is the Mill Branch.  It is a good size branch with lots of water. You can read about it in my other post. It does drain a large area of the Sheffield WMA. The old Tall Pine road comes down the ridge here. It comes from Dent Myers Camp. Dent owns Wildman’s in downtown Kennesaw Ga. I’m not 100 percent sure of how the story goes but I believe he bought that land from Alton Cates, or papa who bought it from Alton.

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Poky Hole

 

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Mill Branch

 

Side note about Dent,  he was hired to be in a commercial for Canon Ball Tobacco. The seen was Dent and other Confederate reenacters charging across a field and a Canon being fired. This was in the 1960 and was being filmed in the pasture where the sub station is now on Tibbitts road. A lot of people gathered to watch the filming. When the canon was fired, it blew off the wheels. Dad said Papa got a big kick out of that and would tell the story often and laugh about it.

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The Tall Pine road used to follow the creek down stream before crossing it just before where the power lines cross now. The creek has washed away the bank and the is no longer room to walk in some places, much less have a road. Once across the creek, the road is the same one that comes up by Carlton’s and then on by Fed’s house. When Papa bought this land it was a public road. He had to put a fence on each side.  During  WW2 War years, when Papa and his three oldest sons and his brother Maston with his sons were cutting lumber, they would haul lumber out of the mountains on this road.

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Below the Mill Branch,  the creek makes a hard right against a big Boulder and travels East. Then in a few hundred yards goes under the power lines for the first time for this trip. One of only two times it travels on the east side of the lines before Crossing a final time in Taylorsville.  As we cross under the power lines we are on the lookout for deer and jump one on the North shore.  A King Fisher then flys by. We didn’t go five minutes the whole trip without seeing a King Fisher.

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Cliffs

 

Just past the power lines is the area known as the cliffs.  Not sure how tall they are, maybe 70 feet or more. On top of the cliff is the Copper mine.  A shaft that goes into the mountain about 30 feet and then has a shaft that goes down who knows how deep. The well part stays full of water.

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Copper mine

A little ways down is some bottom land, the old Charlie Burt farm.  The farm was bought by Jim Grant, he operated Lama’s of Atlanta from this farm.  Jim keep exotic animals on the farm.  He would have several types of deer, Elk, ostrich, zebra, I’m not sure what all he had. The watershead from my land ends up in the stream that flows through his farm. Along with everything between mountain Road, the top of the mountains at the water tower and Burt road. The creek makes a U turn at the Grant house that is on a bluff just above the creek.  We are now going in a northwest direction.  It is starting to get noticeably dark. We spook Wood Ducks a few times.  Once being right in here.

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Camp

We pass our last home sight before going into the WMA section of the creek.  We get right to the edge of the power lines before the creek U turns back to the northeast. It makes a big upside down S shape here and as we enter the top of the upside-down  S,  on the left is a flat area about a 3rd of an acer. The creek is on three sides and a large hillside is to the back. It is truly dark now. We have been using flashlights while padding for the past 15 minutes.  We beach the boat. A good bit of water is in the boat and several of our items are wet, including what we are waring.  We pick out our campsite and start a fire. John gathered most of the wood while I started the fire. Once we had a good fire going, we hung our hammocks. Luckily none of our sleeping gear got wet. One of my pads did but no big deal.  We got out the grill and cooked up two hamburgers each. While the burgers cooked we stripped off our wet clothes and dried them by the fire. I had a pair of dry pant and a long sleeve shirt to sleep in. We had a armadillo come through camp. John has a crank radio and we enjoyed country gold to midnight, then went to sleep shorty afterwards.  I had set out a crayfish trap that night and in the morning had caught, with out any bait, 3 crayfish,  two small fish, and a small turtle. No bigger than a 50 cent peace. We keep the turtle for a collection to the Aquarium. It made the trip to the end, not sure from there what happened to it. Packing up was uneventful.

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Hill Climb at Forsyth Shoals

We may have gotten on the water around 930 or 10. John was now in the back seat. Just above our camp was a small stream coming in on the left. It drains a small Valley in the WMA. There is a old home place there but I am not sure who lived there. Could have be a Forsyth because not far from there is a shoals on the creek called Forsyth Shoals. It is just below our camp and is under the next power line crossing. The creek has a good rock bottom here and was used as a place to ford the creek for many years.  On the North side of the creek is what was once a hill climb for motorcycles in the 60′ and 70’s. Several organized races where held here and covered in dirt bike magazines of the time. At the shoals,  the creek turns a little and is running west. As we go over the falls, John sets up his camera and gets a good action shot of us.

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Forsyth Shoals

Past the Shoals,  the creek stays straight for 1/8 of a mile and then turns North and to the right. At this point is where the wildcat den is supposed to be.  I have yet to find it. It may have be filled in with debris over the years.  I think Joe built a box and put down in it an caught a bobcat.  Just a few more yards down is the stone fence / rock wall that no on knows who built.  We believe it was built by Indians. Papa Hollis Tibbitts said he played on it as a boy and no one at that time knew who built it. It serves no purpose that I can tell. It runs up the side of a steep embankment about 100 feet. It would have been 3 or 4 feet tall when first built.

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Stone fence

We saw a lot of different types of fish in the water as we went. The water was clean and clear.  Very little man made trash was in the water. We only saw a few cans and a few tires the whole trip, and most of that was closer to Taylorsville.  We saw lots of big turtles fallin off log as we would turn a bend in the creek.  We only saw 3 snakes.  We also saw a Blue Heron and a few Red Tail Halks. The health of the creek is very good. The best part of the trip for me, was to know how well the creek is doing and how natural it is.

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About a 1/4 mile on down from the Stone fence, is the Murray branch coming in on the right.  This is the largest amount of water to enter the creek below the Ford.  It has a larger watershed;  From Blue hole road to Burt road to Braswell  Mountain, to HWY 61 to the north end of Narroway Church Cr., to Clay root Rd. The branch was once know as Gold Creek and a few gold mines we operated at its headwaters.  I have seen gold come out of it before and one good nugget.  Narroway once conducted baptisms in the branch below the Church.  Many of my family,  including myself was baptised there.

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Not to far on down the creek is where Clay Root Rd cross the creek.  The road one ran the ridge top from the city of Braswell,  through the Braswell Mountains,  past Iron Stob, past Clay Root,  past Pine mountain,  crossed the creek,  crossed the power lines and ended on Narroway Church Cr.

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We then passed several cabins along the creek belonging to the Cochran family.  The Grindstone Branch enters the creek in this area on the left. The last large branch to do so while in the mountains. The branch gets it name from a mill that once was on this branch.  From the top of Pine mountain there was a road that turned south off of Clay Root Rd and followed a ridge down to Grindstone Branch.  The mill site was just upstream from where the road crossed the branch in a small Valley.  When I was young,  beavers damed up the branch and a good size pond filled the valley.  Dad and I counted 17 dams in that area at that time. The road was blocked by several piles of dirt dumped between the high road banks. This made great four wheeler jumps and mud holes for me to play on. Brandon and I spent a lot of time there. He and I hiked there not to long ago.

Just before the creek exits the mountains there is one more noted area. Harris Bottoms or Sand Bottoms is another area we used to ride four wheelets. There was a large sand bar that had a bowl in it from all the four wheeler that had done donuts in the same spot. It was always a fun destination.  Once I rolled my four wheeler in the creek there. It took several hours to get it running again after getting the water out of the engine.  Another time I came up on Jason Tibbitts walking out. He had run out of gas. That is a long walk so I gave him a ride home. John and I hiked this area last year. Part of the  Union army crossed Raccoon Creek here on their way to Burnt Hickory then onto New Hope and Dallas.  It has a hard rocky bottom for a good long ways.  We decided to stop here for lunch. We grilled the last 3 hamburgers and 2 hotdogs.  We had a nice lunch on the gravel bar. Up to this point we had a tough time with shoals . A lot of dragging the boat. I was hoping that from here on we would be in deeper water.

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I was right about having deeper water but the number of logjams exploded. Up to this point we had only gone under 3 trees. From here to the river, must have been 20 or more. Two of them we cut our what thru,  two we carried the boat around, several we lifted the boat over and some we got out and floated the boat under. The rest we navigated. If the log looked like we could clear under it, no matter how small the space,  John though it fun to gain as much speed as possible and see if I could duck to the bottom of the boad before being decapitated.

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Last Crossing of the Power lines.

We were now in the Etowah River Valley and out of the Braswell Mountains.  The creek travels through hay fields,  cow pastures,  cotton fields and small patches of woods. We cross a few field roads and got out at one to make contact with the rest of the world, having been cut off in the wilderness for atleast 18 hours. John made plans for Linsey to pick us up and we were off again. This was the toughest part of the trip. The logjams really wore us down.  We only saw two other people while on Raccoon Creek and it was a man and woman hanging out on a sand bar in this area. We said hello and kept moving

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Not much to report in this area. We did see one more deer in the creek. About the only history I know is that about half of the Union army crossed Raccoon Creek in this area also on their way to Dallas. (Different from the aboved units)  I read just yesterday about the men bathing in the creek and watering livestock.  May of 1864. We did travel about a mile or more along a farm where the owner had lined the banks with old concrete. We did pass one more cabin and just before the 113 bridge there was a house on the right.

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Once at the bridge we called Linsey again to give her a up date. From Harris Bottoms to the bridge was a longer distance that I thought it would be.  From the bridge to the rive is about a half a mile. We only had one difficult log to cross. We went under the old Railroad bridge for the line that travel from Cartersville to Rockmart.  People used to take the train out to Rockmart and the on over to Van Wert to hear Sam Jone Preach at Van Wert Methodist Church. It later became a Baptist Church. I have direct ancestors buried there on the Johnson side.  We went under the Railroad bridges that supplies plant Bowen. Coal is delivered via train. It is one of the largest Coal fired plants in the country.  Just passed the last Railroad bridge is the Etowah River.  Several people were taking a break from kayaking and on on the left shore.

We enter the Etowah River feeling a real sense of accomplishment. I don’t know of anyone else who has made this same trip.

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Confluence of the Raccoon Creek and Etowah River

From Raccoon Creek at river mile 128 to the Euharlee road bridge at river mile 132 it is an easy 4 miles. The river looked to be up but did not seam to be moving that fast. We quickly pass by the Etowah Cliffs, an antebellum plantation.  At the base of the bluff is a spring coing out of the rock face.

At mile 129.8 is one of dozens of fishing weirs along the river. This one is a little more impressive. It is in a very wide part of the river and is a double V. Lots of nice homes are on this section of the river.

At mile 130.8 is the water intake and discharge for Georgia Powers plant Bowen. The plant takes out 40 million gallons a day and returns half.  The rest is evaporated.  The returning flow is the size of Raccoon Creek and is hot to the touch.  The plant produces 20 percent of the power Georgia Power sells.

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Milam Bridge

At mile 131.2 is Milam bridge. Only the iron skeleton remains.  This is where in 1955, Grady Cochran, who was working for Green Tibbitts at the time sawmilling,  dumped the body of Patricia Cook, a 13 year old girl who he had murdered.  He used chains belonging to Green to weigh the body down. Grady was arrested at the job site. A relative who was a GBI agent was able to get a confession and the location of the body.  He was coveted and died in the Georgia Electric Chair. During the War of Northern Aggression, and before the iron bridge was biilt, half of the Union army crossed the river here. The Confederate Soldiers burned the wood bridge but the Union built a pontoon bridge in its place.

At mile 131.5 is the Euharlee creek. Only a half mile up the creek is the old covered bridge and the old mill. The sisters who ran the mill last had some type of dealings with papa Hollis Tibbitts about timber they owned. I believe he gave them advice on its value. Euharlee is rich in history and has a good little Museum. Well worth the trip.  You can tube the creek down to the river from the town.

Only a half mile more is the Euharlee road bridge at river mile 132. We ended our trip here. Linsey came and picked us up in my truck with in 10 minutes of our arrival.

Very tough adventure.  A little tougher than I thought that it would be.  But very rewarding also. I am very happy with the health of the creek and the amount of wild life we encountered. This completed a live long goal and a bucket list item for me. Raccoon Creek is a channel that I can take to my past, my history,  my family history, history of the land but it is always flowing.

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At the north west end of Florida’s forgotten cost is the 20 mile long St. Joseph Penniscla. From Port St. Joe, travel south then turn right on to a 5 mile cause way at Cape Sand Blast that takes you to the penniscla that turns sharply 90* back north. Where the causeway meets the penniscla, it is only a few yards wide. Just enough room for two lanes of traffic. With the sea threating to make an island out of the pennisclea, the DOT has added huge boulders at the turn and at high tied the waves crash into them. You wont find any high rise condos here like at other beaches. There is not even a hotel. Maybe around 100 homes, one gas station with a store and one icecream shop that serves sandwiches. No restrants, No Bars, No nothing. Just the way we like it. The state park takes up half of the Penniscla. The first three miles house a public beach, a boat ramp into the bay and a campground. The last seven miles are left to nature with one primitive sand road down the center. Closed to auto traffic. The park boast of the tallest sand dunes in the state.

Growing up we would visit Panama City Beach Florida every year. I didn’t know there were other beach for a long  time or that there were roads that could take you there. PCB was the default beach for most people in north Georgia. It was the closest and was cheap. Back then it was local mom and pop, small two story hotels with maybe a small pool. My favorite place to stay was the Page Motel. It was an old two store cheap place but it was right on the beach. We would walk from the living room out the sliding glass door and be on the beach. This was before anyone was building dunes, installing fencing to catch sand or building board walks. The unit had a kitchen, living room and two bed rooms. A lot of times two families would share one unit. Adults would get the beds and kids on the floor. We didn’t care.

The Page is where my younger cousin “only drowned once”. We were swimming in the pool and Jody was around three or four. We had been diving, swimming under water, through in a coin and dive down and get it. Remember there was no pool toys back then. If they were we did not have them. So we made our own. One thing we did have that you wont find at any hotel pool today is a diving board. After a good time swimming we went back in the room and dad asked if we had fun swimming. That is when Jody said he “only drowned once”, meaning he had only went under water once. We all got a big kick out of that.

PCB had a water slide, not a water park with hundreds of different slides and pools and stuff like it has now at Ship Werck Island. This was just maybe two slides. One tall one and one not so tall. The teenagers got to do those, I may have done it once. PCB also had a amusement park called The Miracle Strip. It was more on the lines of a carnival. It did have a wooden roller coaster, a faris wheel, bumper cars, swings, old timie cars, a train, haunted house a lot of the rides you see at carnival and the mid way games too. The ride that got my attention was the one I now know as the himalayon, it is where you are sitting in cars on this big disk and it spins around and around very, very fast going up and down while playing loud rock n roll muice. Well this one was housed in a big iglue with a huge abonable snowman standing over the entry. Very intemadaing for young boy. The other cool thing PBC had was Alvens Island. This was a beach wear, gift, t-shirt supper store inside a volcano. The interior looked like a cave. They had a alligator pit, and you entered through a great white sharks mouth. A must see and still there today.

One trip to PBC was with a large group, as always. In our  ford LTD on the way down was dad driving, mom in the passager set, Tammy my sister in the rear and her friend and cousin Kinda on the other side. Also in the car was my friend and cousin Chris in between them and I was riding on the arm rest between mom and dad, called the hump. Chris was a year or two older than me and we were between the ages of 5 and 7. Chris was a talker and about half way down on our 6 hour plus drive, Kinda offered him five dollars to not say another word till we got to the beach. Well Chris would stay quite for a while and then he would say something. He would want the money and would promise not to talk so Kenda offered him four dollars. This went on until he was down to his last dollar. He stayed quite for a long, long time, until at last he said “you can keep you money, I wished I had talked way before now”. It was on this same trip that we were all at the Miracle Strip, Chris and I were riding on the train. Two teenage girls sitting behind us said hey Chris remember me. Well of course not. We had never seen them before in our lives. They told us that they were his kindergarten teacher. To a 6 year old they looked old enough. They were having fun with him. We knew we did not know them but how did they know Chris’s name? Well by the time the trail pulled in to the station they told us they had read his name off the back of his air brushed shirt and made up the story.

The only time I ever road in a hellocopter was at PCB. This trip it was just me, mom and dad. Dad and I took a hellocopter tour down the beach in one that has the big glass bubble around the cockpit and no doors. Yea that is the one. Being little I was between the pilot and dad. We were half way down the beach, flying along, everything going good when the pilot asked me if I wanted to go on the roller coaster . I remember very distantly saying NO. He didn’t take no for a answer, We went on a roller coaster ride. Strait down to the ocean, strait up to the sky, back to the ocean, back to the sky. We did that three or four more times. Mean while back at the helipad where mom is waiting, a little boy runs up and says that “they went down”. I am surprised mom didn’t have a hart attack right then. She thought it was us. In fact it was the paraselers being pulled by a boat. I am sure it was normal operations for them. But mom didn’t know that at the time.

We had a lot of fun over the years at BPC. I knew it like I lived there my whole live.   More and more condos were built. All the little hotels sold out. We started staying in high rises where it took a lot of effort to get to the beach. You have to walk to the elevator, wait forever on it to get to your floor, it then stops on every floor on the way down, then you have to walk through the pool area to the board walk and finally get to the beach 10 or 15 minutes latter. It soon became the spring break capitol of the world. When Wyatt and Sarah were very young we were staying at a hotel that allowed a church group play loud muisce till midnight in the pool area that our room over looked. None off us could sleep. I complained several times to the front desk but got no satisfaction. That is when we decided we would not be going back to PBC on vacation. However we have going to ship Werck Island and other places there while staying at St. Joseph.

Going to St. Joseph adds another 45 minutes to the PCB trip but it is well worth it. From PCB you go south east down the coast. Most of the trip is the 17 miles through the Kendale Air Force Base. Then the beach community of Mexico Beach. There are a few small hotels and beach homes. Next is Port St. Joe. More of a fishing town because it is on the bay created by St. Joseph Pennicial. A few hotels and small restraint. There is one fast food restraint and grocery store. These is were we do out shopping when staying at the park. Further south down the coast is Apalatchacola, Apalatchacola bay and St. George Island. All the water from Atlanta ends up in Apalatchacola bay via the Chataloochee river, Atlanta’s river.

We have camped at St. Joseph at least four times. The kids have grownup going there and know it well. When they were younger it was easy to keep them entertained with the beach and ocean. As they have gotten older they want more things to do. Wendy and I are beach bums and love to site and just watch the waves role in. We would build sand casels, throw a football or baseball, play with frisbys, fly kits, feed the sea birds, catch crabs and play in the waves. The lay out of the beach is first the privet homes before the park, then the public beach, then the beach for the first campground and finally the beach for the second campground over a three mile span. This makes the beach not  crowded at all. It’s hard to count more than 80 people in eye sight. So there is plenty of room to spread out. The first campground is open with no trees and is just a little closer to the beach. The other campground is very wooded and has a boardwalk leading to the beach. We have stayed in both areas. I think I like the wooded lots better, they offer a little more privatsy. The campgrounds have very nice bathhouses with hot water for showers. We have a shower in the camper but it is easier to go to the bathhouse. Taking showers for a week in the camper with four people would fill the grey water tanks on the camper. Some Campgrounds have swear connections at each site and there is not a problem with taking a lot of showers.

The first year we were there Wyatt and I took the kayak out into the bay. We tried fishing but ended up collecting shells, clams, crabs and scalps. The bay is around waist deep for a long way out and full of sea weed. This was the first time we had caught live craps and scalps.

Wendy’s mother, Hellen spent some time with us on one trip. Another trip Wyatt took his buddy Jona and Sarah took her friend Mikenzy with her for the week. They were between the ages of 12 and 15. As a side note we had a flat on the trip down and the under pinning of the camper started to come off. If you have read more of my post you know these things happen to me. I used straps to hold the underpinning in place. Once at the campground I went back to town and bought a drill and some self-tapping screws. I reattached the underpinning and it is still holding today. Wendy drove the Thaho with the girls and the guys were in the truck pulling the camper. The six of us had a lot of fun. The kids had their bikes and were able to come and go on their own. We spent a lot of time on the beach and in the ocean. We got them mask and snorkels. They explored the bay side of the park. We caught all kinds of sea creatures. We did do a few day trips and one was to a spring that is a state park. It was about an hour or so south east. A very nice place. Once was a private hotel on the site.  1930 . The park runs the hotel now. I was hoping to ride the glass bottom boats like they have at Silver Springs.  But the water quality was poor and the boats were not running.  Here comes the side note. I have been to Silver Springs three or four times. All but once was when I was young.  I remember going with mom, dad, Emily, Turrl and Brandon.  We went on lots of trips together.  We stayed in a hotel outside the park and I remember swimming in the pool.   once with Wendy,  Wyatt and Sarah.  Sarah was just a baby.  That was a fun trip. Silver springs was our first stop. We did it all. The glass bottom boats the petting zoo and gardens. It is a very nice park. We then went to another spring called Juniper Spring. A state park. It had a nice big pool to swim in where the water springs up. The water is very cold. We walked a little was down the creek that was formed by the spring.  This is where Wyatt got into “quick sand” it was where more water was bubbling up and the sand looked as if it was bolling. He sunk down a little.  This same trip we to Bush Gardens. Back to the Spring at St joe. This water was cold too. There is a real big swimming area where the water spring up and create a river. Like Silver Springs.  They have two docks you can swim out to and jump off that are just a foot or two out of the water. All the kids hang out there. Then there is this three story tower that you can jump off. Me and the boys did it at least once. We all took the jungle boat ride and got to see a lot of wildlife up and down the river.  We ate dinner at the hotel in there super nice dinning room. The kids had fun.

Cramping on the beach. I brought my backpack with all my gear with plans to hike the seven miles to the tip of the island.  I headed out in the late afternoon first on my bike. I rode it to the last board walk on the beach and left it there. I hiked on the hard packed sand of the surf just out of reach of the waves. I had only sandals on. I didn’t know it at the time but that was a big mistake.  I passed a few beach goers who were packing up to go in for the night.  The futhur I went the more man made trash there was. Little pieces of plastic,  ropes,  flotation equipment and you name it.  It started to get dark and I had not made it to the tip. I need to find a place to hang my Enos Hamrick. It took a little doing but I found a spot on top of a sand dune that had some small pine trees with a view of the sea. I did have to scavage some rope from the beach to rig up my tarp. I made a small fire and had a frieze dried dinner.  I was really hoping to see a sea turtles come to shore and lay her eggs. They had been nesting all up and down the beach.  Volunteers checked the beach each morning and documented each new nest. They dig up the eggs and count them.  Then the eggs are buried and the nest is marked with a wire mesh to keep predators out and wood stacks to mark the corners.  The date is written on the stacks. There are dossens of nest that I pass. I checked the beach during the night but not turtles.  I did see a dune fox though.  The moon was full and the sea was calm. I made a lot of good photos. The next morning after packing up I explored the sand dunes. From the ocean to the tree line of tall Pines, the dunes extend inland about 300 yards.  It is a very different landscape that I had experienced before. I didn’t make it to the tip,  I came across a four wheeler trail and thinking this would be a good way to cross over to the other side of the pennisclea, I took it. I made it to the bay side by following the trail.  There is no way to walk in the woods here. The undergrowth is way to thick.  A lot of small palms. The bay side wasn’t that fun of a walk. The “beach” was only a few feet wide and on a steep slop.  I walked several miles and decided if I could I would take the next trail to the interor.  The bay side was not a straight line like the ocean side, it had a bump out into the bay. This would have added to the total distant I would have traveled so I wanted to avoid it.  My chance came and I took it.  I would regret wearing sandes to hike in on sand. At first the road out was hard packed but the last mile or so was very loss dry sand. My ankles rolled with each step.  It was about noon. There was no fresh water to filter so I packed all my water in with me. I was about out and it was getting hot. I made it back to my bike for a successful trip.

The kids had seen a vollyball net on the drive in. It was nearly on the mainland a out 10 miles from the camp. With out a since of distance,  they headed out on their bikes to play. They got to the icream shop before stopping.  Lucky that they had a few dollars they were able to buy some drinks.  Even more luckily they were spotted by Wendy on her way back from the laundry mat in town.  She stopped at the store and bough them icream and drinks.  Then gave them a ride back.

Lots of fun at St. Joseph Penniscla.  I am afraid that it to is starting to get developed.

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