Archive for November, 2015


Surviving The Playground

By Trent Tibbitts

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I was talking with a coworker today about childhood playgrounds. That got me thinking about how we survived the playgrounds of the 1970’s and 1980’s.

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We will start with the playground at Dallas Elementary, where I attended K through 4th grade.  There were two separate playgrounds, K through 2nd grade and 3rd grade through 4th grade. Let’s explore the first one. There were the Monkey Bars. Constructed of galvanized steel pipes. If you don’t know what Monkey Bars are let me describe them for you.  Image two ladders about 6 feet high and 15 feet apart connected with another ladder across the top. The idea is to climb the ladder and cross over to the other side by hand over hand hanging from the top ladder. What made ours more interesting was the mud puddle under it. The sun would make the bars very hot. Next to the Monkey Bars were the Jungle Gym. Again made from steel pipes.  Think of a framework of three-foot square boxes stacked on one another, about 21 feet wide and 12 feet high.  Kind of a pyramid. Then we had a poll maybe 12 feet tall that had wedges cut in so you could climb up and then jump off.  Next were eight giant tires that were sunken a third of the way in the ground.  I would crawl inside the side walls of the tires and hang out.  Behind the tires was the tunnel.  The tunnel was a 30 inch concrete Pipe at ground level with dirt piled on top. It to had a mud puddle inside the whole length.  On the side of the playground were the swings. Again made from steel pipes and steal chains. The coolest thing on the playground was what we called the platform and was a long the rear  area. The platform was 4 or 5 feet high,  60 feet long with ramps on each end.  It had several slides coming off of each side that were made of sheet metal.  Very hot. You could hang out under the platform to keep cool but you had to watch out for the nails that were sticking out.  We had a few balance beams and see saws. The other supper cool structure was the cargo net. This one was not like the ones you may see today that are on an angle.  This one went straight up 10 or 12 feet. There were a lot hard surfaces for 5 to 8 year  olds to play on. The worst injury I can remember was someone cutting their head on a nail under the platform.

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The second playground was a lot more open.  There was a ball field where we played kick ball. A “baseball” style game where you drilled your friends with a rubber ball to get them out. We would play Red Rover Red Rover. A game where two teams would line up across from one another and a teammate would run across and try to break the grip of the other team.  We had a tether ball pole. That was not to dangerous but it was just a steel pipe concrete in an old tire. There was a huge concrete pad that had a basketball court on part of it. That was were I learned to shot baskets using the square on the backboard.  During one class out on the pad we  built ovens out of cardboard box’s and tinfoil that we cooked hot dogs in. We would also try to break dance out on the pad.  I remember one day some buddy’s were eating Cool Aid powder on the playground and the teachers though it was drugs.  I don’t think any of us had ever heard of drugs. This playground had Monkey Bars and Jungle Gym too. It also had swings.  These were big swings.  We would get as high as we could and jump off, lot of hang time. Once playing this game I got side ways and on the down swing I hit one of the pole square in the back. I thought I was dead. It knocked the breath out of me. I ran to get help from my teacher who was smoking.  That’s right,  smoking.

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The other regular playground of my youth was the McDonald’s.  Everything there was dangerous also.  There was the ride on Fry Guys that were mounted on a big spring. You would go as back and forth as fast as you could with your head just inches from hitting the ground. If you got going to fast you were slung off.  Then there was the Mary Go Round. You hung on as long as you could while your friends spun it around as fast as they could. Then there was the Hambugerler tree house. All metal.  It was a pipe that had a ladder inside it that you climbed up to get to the hamburger section.  It was alway super hot inside. I think that playground had a super high all steel slide. All the slides would burn you because they were so hot. Every kid in Dallas had their birthday party there.

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I think we stayed at a hotel once that had one of these.

Just some memories.

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This is a list of my ancestors who fought for the Confederacy during the War of Northern Aggression or you may know it as the American Civil War.

MASTON GREEN TIBBITTS.

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My Great, Great, Grandfather Maston Green Tibbitts.  Private, Company K (Etowah Guards of Bartow County), 14th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia. Born October 13, 1845 and Died February 13, 1924. He is buried at the old Harmony Grove Cemetery  in North Paulding County Georgia. On March 19, 1864, at the age of 18, he enlisted into the Confederacy at Coppers furnace in the town of Etowah, Bartow Country Georgia.

The story goes that his two older brothers, who had joined years earlier and were home on furlough, talked him into joining so they could recive a signing bonus. He was promoted to Private on March 19, 1864. He was wounded in the knee on May 6th, 1864 on the second day of the Battle of the Wilderness, VA. His first battle of the war. A mini-ball had passed cleanly through his knee. A silk handkerchief was passed through the hole to clean the wound.  He was transported to a hospital in Augusta, Ga for treatment. After he recovered, he would walk with a limp for the rest of his life. Sherman seized Augusta in November of 1864. Company records show that Maston Green was sick in the hospital in Augusta Ga. on February 28, 1865 . The story goes that he walked home after the war was over. I am not sure if he walked from Augusta or a closer train depot.

He came home a changed man (19 years old) to a changed land.  When he had enlisted, he had two brothers fighting and another had been killed in battle, his father was a member of the Georgia militia, he had a 3 year old brother named  Jefferson D. Tibbitts. I can only assum the D stands for Davis. The Union army under Sherman had the Confederate Army of the Tennessee on the defensive and were battling just a few dozen miles up the road in Dalton Georgia, February 1864. The war was very real to him and I am sure he felt it was his duty to fight. During the time Maston Green was at war, Sherman distorted most of what he knew. During May of 1864, the same month Maston Green was wounded,  the two armys moved away from the railway in Bartow County and down through Paulding County.  More than 120,000 men were raping the country side for anything they could eat. Very little was left after the battles of New Hope, Pickett’s Mill and Dallas. One could argue that no other community Georga was more effective than that of Paulding County and that effect lasted long after reconstruction.  On May 22, 1864 Sherman ordered the destruction of the town of Etowah and its war supporting industry. The town, the biggest in Bartow County at the time, was never rebuild. Etowah was where he in listed into the Confederacy, the unit was known as the Etowah Guards.  I believe Etowah may have been what he would have called his home town. It was much bigger than Dallas at that time.

Being a wounded Confederate Veteran, Maston Green was eligible to attend Bowdon College in Bowdon Georgia, where he learned the craft of a cobbler.  He along with Bill Sheffield and A.C. Scoggins walked from their home in Paulding County to the college, Maston Green was on crutches. The other men would have been wounded also.  From my understanding,  he made two trips.  I am not sure how long he stayed each time at the college.  On his last return trip home, he bought a bread heifer cow from a man named Mr. Dyer in Sand Town who he stayed with overnight. The men relied on the kindness of strangers because of the long journey. Yankees had destroyed everything, there were no stores, hotels, restaurants or anything of the kind.  He was about to get married to Mary Ann Starnes and needed a cow of his own. This was the first livestock to enter north Paulding since the Union invasion of May 1864. They were married on April 5, 1868. At the age of 22. He received a pension of $50.00 for his wounded leg. Recorded on March  29, 1894.

One other story about Maston  Green Tibbitts after the war. He had befriended a Yankee named John while in the hospital. John was wealthy and paid for Maston Green to visit him at his home. He had a fine home in town.  After their greating and socializing,  Maston Green asked to use the rest room. To his surprise, there was a painting of General Robert E. Lee on the wall across from the tollet.  When he returned, he asked John about the painting.  “John why would a Yankee have a photo of Bobby Lee”? John told him, “nothing moves the bowels of a Yankee like seeing General Lee”.

Maston brothers who had talked him into joining were James W. (Jim) Tibbitts and Thomas J. Tibbitts. He had another older brother named William A. Tibbitts who also served in the Confederacy.  We will review them next.

JAMES W. (JIM) TIBBITTS.

My Great, Great, Great Uncle Jim Tibbitts was the oldest of the four brothers who served. He was born on June 29, 1837 and died in 1909. He is buried at Old Harmony Grove Cemetery in North Paulding County, Georgia.

Corporal James Tibbitts served in the 14th Regement, Georgia Infantry, Company K.  Army of Northern Virginia. He was promoted to Private on July 9, 1861 and the promoted to Corporal.  He served through the entire war. He was wounded in the leg at the Battle of Mechanicsville, VA in 1862. He was with General Robert E. Lee at the surrender at Appomattox, April 9, 1865. He also received a  $50.00 pension for his wound.

WILLIAM A. TIBBITTS.

My Great, Great, Great Uncle William Tibbitts was born on June 26, 1839. He moved to Arkansas where he joined and fought with the 6th Regiment, Arkansas Infantry, Company H. He was killed in action on December 31, 1862, at the Battle of Stones River in Tennessee. He is believed to be buried in a mass grave of unidentified Confederate Soldiers in the Evergreen Cemetery in Murphysbor, Tennessee.

THOMAS J. TIBBITTS.

My Great, Great, Great Uncle Thomas Tibbitts was born  December 12, 1841 and died on June 18, 1924. He is buried at Mt. Moriah Baptist Church in North Paulding County, Georgia.

Thomas Tibbitts was a Sergeant in the 14th Regiment,  Georgia Infantry, Company K, Army of Northern Virginia. He was promoted to Private on July 9, 1861 and then appointed Corporal in 1864 before being promote to Sergeant.  Like his other brothers before him was wounded in the leg  a few days after Maston Green at the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House,  VA., on May 12, 1864. He was on w  He was awarded a  $25.00 pension on July 16, 1888. He went on to join the KKK and his headstone  still has those letters on it today.

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Photo of Tibbitts brothers.

JOSEPH CHATMAN TIBBITTS.

My Great, Great, Great Grandfather Joseph Tibbitts was the father of James,  William,  Thomas and Maston Green Tibbitts.  He was a member of the Georgia militia but saw no action as far as we know.

THOMAS PERRY STARNES.

My Great, Great, Great Grandfather Thomas Starnes was the father in law to Maston Green Tibbitts and was listed in the Georgian Guard. His age may have keep him out of the regular army but I suppose that since his family ran Starnes Mill on Punkinvine Creek he was exempt from the front lines.

Elijah T. Starnes

My Great, Great, Great, Uncle Elijah T. Starnes was born in 1833 and died on June 18, 1822. He is buried at the Kennedy -Starnes Cemetery in North Paulding County.

Elijah T. Starnes  was a Private in Company D, 36th Regiment, Georgia Infantry.  He died from measles at home in Paulding County while on sick furlough.

Elijah T. Starnes had a brother in-law, David Kennedy who also served as Private in Company D, 36th Regiment, Georgia Infantry. He to is buried in the Kennedy -Starnes Cemetery in North Paulding County Georgia.

David Kennedy

David Kennedy was brother to my Great, Great, Great Aunt Sarah Kennedy Starnes.  He was born on January 29, 1835 and died on December 12, 1924.

David Kennedy was promoted to Private on March 11, 1862. He was captured at Barker’s Creek, Mississippi on May 17, 1863. He was paroled on July 3, 1863 at Fort Delaware, in the state of Delaware.  He was exchanged at City Point Va. On July 6, 1863. He was captured again at Marietta, Ga. On July 18, 1864. He was released at camp Douglas in Illinois on June 17, 1865.

David Francis Marion Starnes

My Great, Great, Great, Uncle D. F. M. Starnes was born in 1839 and died in 1899. He is buried at the old Harmony Grove Cemetery in North Paulding County Georgia.

D. F. M. Starnes was a Private in Company A, 40th Georgia Infantry.  He was promoted to Private on March 10, 1862. He was captured on May 16, 1863 at Barker’s Creek, Mississippi. He was part of a POW exchange later in 1863. 

My father is Thomas Hershel Tibbitts son of Joseph Hollis Tibbitts, son of  Maston Elihu Tibbitts, son of Maston Green Tibbitts and Mary Ann Starnes. Maston Green is the son of Joseph Chitman Tibbitts and Mary Ann is the daughter of Thomas Perry Starnes.

WILLIAM  (BILL) BONE.

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My Great, Great, Grandfather  Bill Bone was born on May 26, 1828 and died on July 4, 1908. He is buried at the Dallas City  Cemetery, Paulding County Georgia.  He served as a Private in the Georgia Cavalry,  4th Regiment, Company L. Under L. B. Anderson.

Bill Bone had two brothers, Henry and John, and one son, Bailey Bone Jr, plus two brother in-laws, Esech Owen and George Owens, that served with the CSA.

BAILEY BONE JR.

My Great, Great Uncle Bailey Bone Jr was born on March 18, 1848 and Died on Feb 27, 1934. He is buried at the Dallas City Cemetery in Paulding County Georgia.  He was in the Georgia State Troops,  1st Regiment,  Company A. Not sure when he would have joined but it would have been before he was 16.

HENRY BONE.

My Great, Great, Great Uncle Henry Bone was born on October 15, 1832 and died March 19, 1904. He is buried at the Dallas City Cemetery in Paulding County Georgia.  He served as a Private then a Sergeant in the Georgia Infantry, 60th Regiment, Company K, Army of Northern Virginia.  Major battles he was in were Gettysburg,  2nd Manassas and the Wilderness. He was promoted to Private on May 10, 1862 and appointed Sergeant February 1863. Roll date of November 9, 1864 last on file shows him absent.

JOHN BONE.

My Great, Great, Great Uncle John Bone was born June 3, 1836 and died March 2, 1904. He is buried at the Dallas City Cemetery in Paulding County Georgia.  John was a 2nd Corporal in the Georgia Infantry, 22nd Regiment,  Company C.

ESECH BROWN OWEN.

My Great, Great, Great Uncle  Esech Owen was married to Mary Bone. He was born July 27, 1841 and died May 3, 1901. He served in the Georgia Infantry, 22nd Regiment, Company C.  He is buried at the Dallas City Cemetery in Paulding County, Georgia.

GEORGE A. OWENS.

My Great, Great, Great Uncle George Owens was married to Nancy A. Bone and brother to Esech Owen. Though one spell their name with an “S”. Their Grandfathers were Revolutionary Soldiers,  Thomas Owens and Esic Brown.  George was born 1822 and died Feb 6, 1901. He was a millwrigh for the Confederacy and owner of Owens Mill on Punkinvine Creek,  the same site as what is know as the old electric dam.

My mother is Letty Jane  Bone, daughter of Tom Watson Bone, son of Clifford Anderson Bone, son of John T. Bone, son of William Bill Bone.

WILLIAM HARVEY CREW.

My Great, Great, Grandfather William Crew was born September 24, 1830 and died February 13, 1903. He is buried at the High Shoals Cemetery in North Paulding County Georgia.

William was a Sergeant in the Georgia Infantry,  60th Regiment, Company K. He was mustered into service on May 10, 1862. The following is a list of engagements he would has fought in with the 60th Georgia Infantry.

Second Winchester, VA.  June 14, 1862.

Seven Day Battles, VA. June 25 to July 1, 1862.

Gaines’ Mill, VA. June 27th, 1862.

Malvern Hill, VA. July 1, 1862.

Cedar Mountain,  VA. August 9, 1862

Bristol and Manassas Junction, VA. August 26 and 27, 1862.

Kettle Run, VA. August 27, 1862.

Second Manassas, VA. August 28-30, 1862.

Chantilly, VA. September 1, 1862.

Harper’s Ferry, West Virginia.  Septembe 12-15, 1862.

Antietam, Maryland.  September 17, 1862. Where he was wounded and sent home to recover.

As Sherman marched into Georgia down from Chattanooga Tennessee in the spring of 1864, William Crew enlisted a 2nd time. This time as a Private in the Army of the Tennessee,  Georgia Cavalry,  4th Regiment,  Company L.  Avery’s, under General Joe Wheeler, on May 9th in Dallas.  Just two weeks before Union forces would enter his community of Burnt Hickory on their way to the Battles of New Hope,  Pickett’s Mill and Dallas. The following is a list of engagements William fought in while serving in the Cavalry.

Resaca, Georgia

Pickett’s Mill, Georgia.  Near Allatoona church.

All engagements through the Atlanta campaign.

The defence of Savanna.

The Carolinas campaign. 12th Georgia Cavalry.

Served to the end of the war and was surrendered by General Joseph E. Johnston at Durham Station,  N.C. on April 26, 1865.

My father is Thomas Hershel Tibbitts, son of Marie’ Emily Crew, daughter of Arthur Harvey Crew, son of William Harvey Crew.

ALFRED GABRIEL DUKE

My Great, Great, Grandfather Alfred Duke was born May 24, 1850 and died May 13, 1920. He is buried in the Duke family Cemetery in Powder Springs.

He served as a Private in the Georgia Cavalry, 1st Regiment, Company G, Army of the Tennessee.  He had six brothers who also served. One who had been killed in action, one had died in a military hospital and another died in 1862 and is buried in a Confederate Cemetery in Petersburg VA. Alfred enlisted April 12, 1864, in Oxford Alabama.  He was surrendered on April 26, 1865, at  Durham Station N.C. with General Joseph E. Johnston and the Army of the Tennessee to Sherman.  He was paroled on May 3, 1865 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  He died in the Confederate Soldiers Home of Georgia in Atlanta. Of note, Alfred’s Grandfather, Georgia Norwood was a Revolutionary War Soldier.

JAMES F. DUKE.

My Great, Great, Great Uncle James Duke was born December 20, 1830. He enlisted on September 25, 1861. Served in the Georgia Infantry, 30th Regiment, Company G.

WILLIAM H. DUKE.

My Great, Great, Great Uncle William Duke was born Decembe 5, 1833 and died on August 18, 1862. He is buried in the Duke family Cemetery in Powder Springs with his brother Alfred.

William was a Private in the Georgia Infantry,  2nd Regiment, Company I. He died in Lookout Mountain Hospital,  Chattanooga Tennessee. Not sure but may have been the hospital that was in the cave at the base of the mountain. When building the Railroad tunnel, the cave entry was covered.

GEORGE W. DUKE.

My Great, Great, Great Uncle George Duke was born on July 3, 1836. He enlisted on August 23, 1861. He was a Private in the Georgia Infantry, 7th Regiment, Company D. Army of Noth VA.  He was discharged on December 25, 1861, Christmas day, at Richmond, Virginia. The same day his brother Noah was killed in action. They were in the same Company.  I assume he was discharged so he could accompany the body home.

JOHN L. DUKE.

My Great, Great, Great Uncle John Duke was born on  November 13, 1838. He enlisted as a Private in the Georgia Infantry, 1st Regiment,  Company L. Army of the Tennessee on February 27, 1862. On May 1st, 1862 he made 2nd Corporal and later Sargent.  He was surrendered on April  26, 1865 in Greensboro, North Carolina.

NOAH S. DUKE.

My Great, Great, Great Uncle  Noah Duke was born in 1841 and died on December 25, 1861. He was a Private in the Georgia Infantry, 7th Regiment, Company D. Army of Northern Virginia.  He died at Culpeper, Virginia. Culpeper was a hot bed throughout the war with over 160 battles and skirmishes.  I suppose that he was killed during on of the skirmishes.

THOMAS MARION DUKE. 

My Great, Great, Great Uncle Thomas Duke was born March 14, 1828 and died August 30, 1862. I  believe he was a Corporal in the Georgia Infantry, 27th Regiment, Company F. I  also believe he is buried in the Confederate Soldiers section of the Blandford Cemetery,  Petersburg City, VA.

My mother is Letty Jane Bone, daughter of Tom Watson Bone, son of Mamie Estelle Duke, daughter of William Harvey Duke, son of Alfred Gabriel Duke.

J. WYATT LEE.

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My Great, Great, Grandfather J. Wyatt Lee was born February 17, 1840 and died January 9, 1903. He is buried at High Shoals Baptist Church in North Paulding County.  He was a First Lieutenant in the Georgia Infantry, 22nd Regiment, Company C. He had one brother to serve.

JAMES HARTWELL LEE.

My Great, Great, Great Uncle James Lee was born August 11, 1845 and died November 22, 1898. He hung himself.  He is buried at High Shoals Baptist Church in North Paulding County Georgia.  He was a Private in the Georgia Cavalry, 22nd Regiment, Company C.

My father is Thomas Hershel Tibbitts, son of Marie’ Emily Crew, daughter of Annie Fairfield Lee, daughter of J. Wyatt Lee.

SEABON LENOIR WESTMORELAND.

My Great, Great, Great,  Grandfather Seabon Westmoreland was born  November 6, 1840 and died November 29, 1935. He served as a Private in the Georgia Infantry Batts, Smith Legion. He enlisted onAugust 16, 1862. He transferred to the Georgia Infantry , 60th Regiment, Company K.  In March 1863. He was detailed as a nurse because of Smallpox in Frank Ramsey Hospital,  Loudoun Tennessee, from April 15, 1863 to September 21, 1863. Seaborn had one brother to serve. Note, Seaborn had a Great Grandfather, John Westmoreland who was a Revolutionary war Soldier.

ROBERT DERRY WESTMORELAND.

My Great, Great, Great, Great Uncle Robert Westmoreland was born in 1839. He was a Private in the Georgia Infantry, 60th Regiment, Company C and H.

My mother is Letty Jane Bone, daughter of Polly Ruth Manley, daughter of Erwin Manley, son of  Alice Westmoreland, daughter of Seabon LeNoir Westmoreland.

 

YOUNG MARCUS ALEXANDER HANLAWAY DURHAM.

My Great, Great Grandfather Young Marcus Durham was born September 15, 1823 and died November 2, 1900. He is buried at the old High Shoals Cemetery in North Paulding County Georgia. He went by Young and was nick named “alphabet”. The story goes that each of his sisters got to give him a name.

I don’t know much if any about his service.  I had one peace of information that said he was a Confederate Soldier. I did find a Y.M. Durham that was in the Tennessee Cavalry, 5th Regiment, McKenzie’s. I am very unsure.

My father is Thomas Hershel Tibbitts, son of Marie’ Emily Crew, daughter of Arthur Harvey Crew, son of Emily E. Durham, daughter of Young Marcus Alexander Hanlaway Durham.

REV. WILLIAM R.D. TWILLEY

My Great, Great Grandfather Rev. William Twilley was born in 1825 and died in 1911. He is buried at Mount Moriah Baptist Church in North Paulding County, Georgia.  He was a Sergeant in the Georgia Cavalry, 9th  Battalion, Company F.

While William was away at war, his daughter Rosanna, age 11, was seriously burned when her dress caught fire. I  believe from stumbling into the fire place or just being to close.  She was unable to eat and survived on milk. One report states that when seeing the child’s condition, a Confederate Officer said that William’s services was need more at home taking care of his family and sent for him. I’m not sure if he made it home before she died or not. When Sherman marched through,  his Soldiers killed the cow and took only the liver. With the cow dead, there was no source of milk and Rosanna died of starvation.  In 1880, her mother Mary Townsend Twilley made a rope and hung herself with it. They are all buried at Mount Moriah Baptist Church in North Paulding County, Georgia. Where in 1880, the New Hope Baptist Association was formed and Rev. William Twilley was it’s first Moderator. Also of note, Mount Moriah was constituted and built in 1842 from logs. This Church was dismantled and used to make a bridge over Punkinvine Creek near Jones Mill, just below the Church.  My Grandfather Hollis Tibbitts and my father Thomas Hershel Tibbitts were Pastors of this Church and My brother Todd Tibbitts is currently Pastoring there.

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M father is Thomas Hershel Tibbitts, son of Joseph Hollis Tibbitts, son of France Victoria Bowman, daughter of Sarah Elizabeth Twilley, daughter of Rev. William R.D. Twilley.

JOSEPH ATTAWAY MANLEY.

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My Great, Great, Great, Grandfather Joseph Manley was born in November 1819 and died in 1901. He served in the 4th Battalion GA Sharpshooters along with his brothers, Jasper and James. Brothers John Washinton and Daniel Jackson also served. Joseph’s Grandfather was Daniel Manley and he too was a Revolutionary War Soldier.

JAMES MANLEY

My Great, Great, Great, Great Uncle James Manley was born in 1830 and  Served in the 4th Battalion GA Sharpshooters.

JASPER  WHITLEW MANLEY.

My Great, Great, Great, Great Uncle Jasper Manley was born on April 9, 1837 and died April 8, 1916. He is buried in Santa Clar, CA. Jasper served as a Georgia Sharpshooter, 4th BH. He was captured at Missionary Ridge November 25, 1863. Was sent to Rock Island POW camp and survied the war. He signed an oath of alleiance to the Union.  He joined the Union Navy and served aboard the USS Ohio. He went home to Franklin County after the war and was literally run out of town. He moved around Ga. For a while,  but as soon as people found out, they made life difficult for him. He finally moved to California . As a final affront,  he deeded all his lands to his former slaves as he was leaving .

JOHN WASHINTON MANLEY

My Great, Great, Great, Great Uncle John Washinton Manley was born on January 26, 1836 and died on August 21, 1921. He is buried in Jack County Texas.  John served in the 34th GA. John moved to Texas after the war.

DANIEL JACKSON MANLEY

My Great, Great, Great, Great Uncle Daniel Jackson Manley was born on November 14, 1815 and died on October 4, 1888. He is buried on his son’s farm in Carnsville GA. Daniel served in the Franklin County Home Guard.

My mother is Letty Jane Bone, daughter of Polly Ruth Manley, daughter of Erwin Manley, son of James A. Manley, son of Joseph Attaway Manley.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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