Montana – The Bob

By Trent Tibbitts

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Part one. – Introduction

I was invited to join my brothers on the same trip they had taken a few years ago to the Bob Marshall Wilderness in Montana.  The  Bob is a one Million acre Wilderness in the middle of 4 million acres of national forest. It’s northern border is the southern border of the Glacier National Park.  It is a 14 day trip with 10 days in the Wilderness.  For those who may not know,  a wilderness doesn’t have roads and mechanized equipment is not allowed.  Bicycles are not allowed much less gas-powered equipment.  The group will be Todd, Keith, Brett, and myself who will join Todd Hunter along with his wife and three-year old daughter.  On day one we will fly out to Salt Lake with a layover in  LA before flying on into Montana.  Todd will pick us up at the airport.  We will spend the next day gathering last-minute items and packing. We will ship most of our supplies days early and have a mule team pack our gear in for us before we get there.  What we will be carrying will be our clothes and small items.  On day three we will get up early and load up the horses and drive several hours to the national forest that surrounds the Bob. Then a few more hours on the dirt roads to the trail head where we will unload the horses and pack them up. It is a 20 mile ride to the campsite on the Flathead river.  Day four will be cutting firewood and finish setting up camp. Day five will be the opening of Elk season.  Todd and Brett will be hunting.  I plan on doing a lot of fishing and hiking.  We will pack out on day twelve and fly home on day fourteen.

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I have started to gather the items that I will need on the trip.  I have to get it ready to ship out. I bought an air mat, ordered a hiking guide-book,  ordered a case of MREs, and ordered hip waders.  I am in the process of going through my supplies and packing.  But first I was thinking of a survival kit.  We will be in very remote county and you never know what will happen.  While the camp will be well stocked with anything we need, I want a pack that I can carry with me anytime I leave camp. Here is what I came up with.  A 7 by 9 tarp for a shelter.  Water filter life straw with bag. First aid kit stocked with 6 band aids,  2 butterfly bandages,  4 small band aids, 2 round small band aids, 2 gauze Triple Antibiotic, Sting relief,  antiseptic wipe, razor, med tape, candle, and water proof matches all in a ten box. In a 32 oz water bottle that has measurements marked on the sides I put a saw, several fishing hooks, 20 feet of fishing line, artificial bate, lighter,  Swiss Army knife,  whistle,  compass,  2 packs of peanut butter, hand warmer, light stick and cord. I lashed the bottle to the bag with the tarp and first aid kit. Then added a carabiner.  All together it is less than 5 pounds.  This will help me survive a few days if need be.

Part 2 – Packing

The following is a list of the items I will be taking from home to the Bob. We will pick up a few items once in Montana like more food and bear spray.

This is my ENO hammock system. It includes the 2 man hammock, 2 Slap Straps, Rain Fly, 7 sections of 5 foot each paracord, 2 carabineers, 2 quick tie carabineers and bag that it all goes into.

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This is my 30 degree sleeping bag, air pillow and silk sleeping bag insert. The silk increase the warmth of the bag.

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Odds and Ends Bag. 2 pair of Hand warmers, Tooth Past and Toothbrush, large knife, Compass, Leather Man multi tool, pocket knife, AA batteries, Candle, Lamp, Head Lamp, Flashlight with lamp, 2 glow sticks, 100 feet of paracord, battery charger for phone and bag.

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This is to show what is inside a MRE (meals ready to eat). Gum, Salt, Seasoning, Most Towel, Toilet Paper, Drink mix, Energy bar, Applesauce, Crackers, Main Meal, M&M, Spoon, Peanut Butter. You put the Main Meal in the green bag, add a little water, fold over the end and place it in the box. A chemical reaction takes place and heats the Meal.

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This is the camera equipment I will be taking along with my phone. Camera Bag, mini CD for the camcorder, Camcorder, utility knife, extra memory card, tripod, bag for extra lens, 35 mm to 55 mm, camera with 55 mm to 110 mm zoom with and a polarizing filter.

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Binoculars with case.

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Three Blue Jeans, Two Camouflage Paints, One Weather Proof Paints, Six Long sleeve shirts and two short sleeve shirts.

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Survival Kit. Saw, Glow Stick, Artificial bate, Hand Warmers, Whistle and compass, cord, two Peanut Butter, Swiss Army Knife, Lighter with 20 feet of fishing line, two different size fishing hooks and a water bottle with measurements listed on the side.

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Orange Vest and hat for Hunting. Fishing Vest. Two pair of gloves, Rain Paints. Rain Jacket, two different toboggans.

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High top water proof boots, Hiking Boots, Cowboy hat, tracking poles. 9mm pistol with holsters and extra clips.

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Nine MREs and 4 Mountain House dinners with one desert. Two water bottles.

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Four pair of socks (I added 4 more pair), 4 pair of underwear.  Fleece Vest, Fleece pullover, two tee shirts, three under paints, 4 long sleeve under shirts.

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Three sets of insulated underwear and one long sleeve under armor and one short sleeve under armor. Air Mat.

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Hip Waders.

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I updated my first aid kit to this one that had a lot more items. Everything but my food, Camera and a few items in my day pack.

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This is all I am taking with me. I was able to get the air mat into the duffle bag.

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Part 3 – Forest Fires

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Update.  August 23rd.  T -18 days. Several wildfires are burning in the western states, including Montana. It has been very dry there and it has been a bad year for fires. They have claimed the lives of firefighters, burned homes and thousands of acers of land. Todd got word from Todd Hunter that a 400 acer fire grew to be a 10000 acre fire over night on Friday. It burned the parking lot of the Meadow Creek trail head where we were to start our ride into the Bob on houses.   Trucks and trailers belonging to people who were in the Bob at the time were destroyed by the fire.  Todd Hunter was helping with the evacuation.

From the National Forest Web Site on August 24th.

FIRE SUMMARY: Two large fires are being managed by the Northwest Montana Type 3 Incident Management Team Bear Creek Fire and Trail Creek Fire. Management objectives and priorities for the fires are: Firefighter and public safety, minimizing the impacts to recreationists, local outfitter & guides and resorts, and protection of the Spotted Bear Ranger Station facilities.

FIRE STATUS:

Bear Creek Fire – Size: 19,595 acres. The fire burned today with moderate fire behavior and moved toward the east onto Meadow Mountain and is moving down Larch Creek to the north. Firefighters mopped up hot spots at Meadow Creek Trailhead and completed structure protection (wrapping with fire resistant material) on the recreation facilities loading ramp, hitch rails, bulletin boards and the Meadow Creek Gorge Pack Bridge.

Trail Creek Fire – Size: 9,500 acres. The Flat Creek Fire and Trail Creek Fire have joined and will now be managed as the Trail Creek fire. A management objective for this fire is to keep the fire to the north of the Spotted Bear River Road.

CLOSURES:
– The Spotted Bear River Road #568 is closed, as well as the trailheads and trail systems which start from this road.
– An extensive area closure for the Trail Creek Fire is in place in the upper Middle Fork from the Spotted Bear River Road and the Eastside Reservoir Road around Upper and Lower Twin Creek, eastward to Dolly Varden Creek.
-A large area closure is in place in the northern portion of the Bob Marshall Wilderness. The Meadow Creek and Gorge Creek Trailheads are closed. The Eastside South Fork Trail #80 is closed from Meadow Creek Trailhead south to Damnation Creek. Access to the Bob Marshall Wilderness is via western and southern trailheads.

See the map above. We were to camp on Black Bear Creek just above Black Bear Cabin. We were to enter on the yellow road that is now closed and come down the yellow trail that is now closed. Maybe the area will be reopened by the time we get there. Todd is looking for other locations for us. We may have to come in another way and camp closer to the Salmon Forks Cabin as I understand it.

News update.

Two fires in the remote Spotted Bear Ranger District of the Flathead National Forest on the edge of Montana’s Bob Marshall Wilderness exploded late Thursday, prompting emergency evacuations of outfitters and more than 70 head of stock and the closure of a major wilderness trailhead.

The Bear Creek fire, about 55 miles south of Hungry Horse, exploded from 465 acres Thursday morning to 17,755 by evening, driven by high winds. The Trail Creek fire grew from 3,500 to 8,463 acres, consuming a smaller fire as it moved through the heavy timber.

Al Koss, a public information officer, said even computer modeling couldn’t predict how fast the fires would move.

“It was just a very unusual situation that occurred yesterday,” Koss said.

With the fire headed toward the Meadow Creek Outfitters, which has five corrals used by outfitting businesses, Forest Service personnel teamed with outfitter employees to round up 70 mules and horses. Halters had to be put on the animals, which then had to be loaded onto trucks.

The evacuation, which was occurring at about 6 p.m., proceeded efficiently, Koss said.

“People knew what they needed to do and they got on it and it happened,” Koss said. “It was a little bit chaotic, but the district here is used to working with stock.”

The remote U.S. Forest Service ranger district is on the southern end of the Hungry Horse Reservoir. Employees arrive in May and move out in December. It includes homes for employees, bunkhouses and a warehouse.

There wasn’t room to fit all of the animals in the trailers, so some were let loose. A person on a horse moved them down the road and out of the fire’s path, Koss said.

No injuries to people or stock animals were reported, and no structures were lost, he said.

As the operation was finishing up, the fire was moving down the hill toward the trailhead, Koss said. Once they were out of danger, forest personnel and the outfitters watched the fire roar through. After it passed, they went back in and started putting water on the Meadow Creek Gorge Pack Bridge so it wouldn’t burn.

However, a few outfitter vehicles and trailers were burned, as well as some hay.

The two major fires are just two of more than 20 burning in the Spotted Bear Ranger District in the Bob Marshall Wilderness and the Great Bear Wilderness.

The fires were sparked by lightning storms that passed through on Aug. 12 and Aug. 14.

A type III incident management team has been assigned to two major fires.

“We’re finally starting to get a few more resources in, some crews, some engines,” Koss said. “That’s helping.”

Given how fast the fires moved, structure protection is now occurring at the Spotted Bear Ranger District compound, which is 10 miles north of the Bear Creek fire.

The high winds pushed the Bear Creek fire east down Bunker Creek and across the South Fork of the Flathead River. The fire moved through the Gorge Creek and Meadow Creek trailheads and the Meadow Creek Outfitters Corrals.

Heavy winds drove the blaze through heavy fuels and it built up energy as it moved across the landscape, faster than computer modeling had predicted it could move, Koss said.

Thinning of fuels that occurred in the area over the past few years helped to reduce the severity of the burning through the trailheads, he said.

The Meadow Creek trailhead, a major trailhead into the Bob Marshall Wilderness, has been closed. With the trailhead closed, the wilderness will now need to be accessed from the west or southern sides.

News update.

The Bear Creek Fire near Spotted Bear swept through about eight miles of forest, jumped the South Fork River and grew from 465 to 17,755 acres in just a few hours Thursday afternoon.

The fire’s rampage torched vehicles, sheds and trailers at the Meadow Creek Trailhead, although livestock were rescued from the fire area.

The fire was sparked by lightning Aug. 12 and by Thursday morning had only burned about 465 acres in the Flathead National Forest several miles south of the Spotted Bear Ranger Station.

Then it erupted on Thursday, driven by rising temperatures and wind.

No one has been injured in the fire’s expansion, and the only threatened structure, the Meadow Creek pack bridge, has been outfitted with sprinklers and was untouched — despite the fire burning on both sides of the creek.

“What protected the bridge, it’s open around there, and as soon as crews were able to get into that area they started wetting it down with water from the engines,” fire spokesman Al Koss said.

The Trail Creek Fire, another lightning-caused fire south of the ranger station,  also was stirred up by the windy conditions Thursday, more than doubling to 8,463 acres from 3,500 acres.

Koss said firefighters were able to get about 70 livestock out of the Bear Creek Fire area unscathed, and wilderness rangers swept through trails to guide eight to 10 visitors to safety.

The fire has since slowed down but had still seen some activity Friday afternoon as it continued to move east.

“As the humidities dropped and the temperatures went up, the inversion broke,” Koss said of the fire’s run on Thursday. “It started building energy, it crossed Bunker Creek to the south and actually got into a place where the Late Creek Fire was burning and started burning in very thick timber on a north-facing slope … As the fire started building and gaining momentum, it got more energy and started to move fast, and those winds really pushed it through that timber.”

Winds were gusting at about 30 to 35 miles in the area on Thursday.

Koss said no suppression activities are being conducted aside from point protection, assessing where the fire is headed and what structures may be threatened. About 10 miles north of the fire front sits the Spotted Bear Lookout, and the Black Bear Cabin is about 10 miles south.

No structures are currently threatened, but forest officials are planning to wrap both structures in fire-resistant materials in the next couple days.

While the fire tore raced through the densely wooded area, Koss said that fuel reduction around the Meadow Creek outfitter corrals and Gorge Creek helped keep property damage to a minimum.

“There were approximately 15 vehicles from people recreating and all of those vehicles were spared,” he said. “That’s kind of neat to be able to see that that really worked — it met its intention of fuels reduction right there.”

Update Aug. 26. The Bear Creek Fire east of Swan Lake continues to be the largest blaze in the state, chewing through more than 28,000 acres. On Wednesday, fire crews were mopping up the area around the Meadow Creek Trailhead that burned late last week when the fire grew from 465 acres to more than 17,000 in just four hours. Fire crews are also working on protecting various backcountry structures in the area.

Fire Tower being covered with fire resistant material.

News Update.

Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 8:06 am | Updated: 5:21 pm, Wed Aug 26, 2015.

Frustration, awe and relief. That might best describe the mood at the Spotted Bear Ranger Station as fires burned both to the north and south of the remote outpost on the north end of the Bob Marshall Wilderness.

The Bear Creek Fire struck awe Thursday afternoon, defying the best fire models as it burned more than 17,000 acres in just a few hours.

The fire had skunked on the slopes above the Bunker Creek Road for several days but appeared to be in check. But on Thursday afternoon it burned down the slope, crossed the Bunker Creek Road and got a head on the north slopes, explained incident commander Andy Huntsberger.

The north slopes in a normal year are wet, but in this historic dry year the fire took off and raced down the Bunker Creek Road and across the South Fork of the Flathead in a matter of hours.

Both private citizens along with Forest Service and fire crews were able to get about 70 head of stock out of the outfitter camps before the fire blew over. No animals or people were injured but three vehicles burned – two older trucks and a newer Subaru as well as some stock trailers, a tack shed, an outfitter tent and some hay, said public information officer Al Koss.

The fire is now more than 28,000 acres.

But despite the fire’s intensity, it laid down when it got to the Meadow Creek Trailhead and campground, where the forest had been recently thinned. Other thinned areas along the Meadow Creek Road had spot fires, but were not actively burning. By contrast, the unthinned areas were a moonscape of fried trees. The Meadow Creek pack bridge was unscathed by the blaze, though a bridge in the upper end of Bunker Creek did burn.

Huntsberger said the fire defied the models. He said their fire analyst has run the scenario through computer models several times and it still doesn’t do what Mother Nature cooked up.

There was also sense of frustration among Forest Service personnel from the Trail Creek Fire.

The fire, burning 9,500 acres north of the Spotted Bear River Road, had burned through timber sales – sales that would have likely been harvested by now had they not been held up by several years of litigation – litigation that the Forest Service prevailed on. The sales were designed to thin the forest and restore historic Ponderosa pine stands in the area that had been overcrowded by fire prone species like lodgepole pine.

The Bear Creek Fire is now listed at more than 28,700 acres and is moving to the east in the Bob Marshall Wilderness. It’s about four miles from the Spotted Bear Ranger Station. Protecting the ranger station and nearby outfitter camps is the top priority for fire managers.

A host of trails, including the Spotted Bear River Road, Spotted Bear Campground and the Meadow Creek Road and campgrounds area are all closed.

A contrast

A contrast

Al Koss looks over the Meadow Creek Trailhead and camp where a previous thinning project stopped the Bear Fire from destroying the campground.

New Update

Posted: Thursday, August 27, 2015 5:24 pm | Updated: 1:30 pm, Fri Aug 28, 2015.

As fires bloom, the options to recreate in the Bob Marshall Wilderness are rapidly diminishing.

The Spotted Bear Ranger District will shut down the entire wilderness portion of the district because of fires and fire danger beginning Friday morning, fire information officer Al Koss said. That includes lands in both the Bob Marshall and the Great Bear wilderness areas.

 The closure includes the Schafer Meadows Airstrip.

The nonwilderness portion remains open although Spotted Bear Campground is closed. Koss said wilderness rangers are giving people already in the backcountry a few days to get out of the area.

The decision came as at least 20 multiple fires burn in the district east of the Flathead Valley. One new fire, detected Wednesday is near Lena Lake in the wilderness. That fire is now 40 acres, forcing the closure of the Holland Lake Trailhead.

The Meadow Creek Trailhead also is closed due to fires.

On the other side of the mountains, meanwhile, the Rocky Mountain Ranger District has closed the Benchmark Trailhead as well as several trails up and down the Rocky Mountain Front due to fires.

The Benchmark Fire is about 50 acres, according to public information officer Wendy Clark. The Benchmark closure means three of the most-used trailheads into the Bob Marshall Wilderness are now closed.

The Benchmark Road is closed from the Benchmark Wilderness Ranch to the trailhead. An evacuation order is in place for dwellings in the area.

In Spotted Bear, outfitter ranches in the area have been fitted with sprinkler systems and a line was put around the Wilderness Ranch on the Meadow Creek Road, Koss said. The lodges in the area are privately owned but are on land leased from the Forest Service.

The Bear Creek Fire, the largest in the state at more than 28,000 acres, is working its way down to the Meadow Creek Road near Jungle Creek. Crews have created a shaded fuel break in the area to keep the fire from spreading east toward the Spotted Bear Ranger Station as well as the Spotted Bear Ranch and Diamond R Ranch.

The fires could gnarl hunting season in the backcountry.

Archery season starts Sept. 5 and general hunting season starts in the wilderness Sept. 15. Many outfitters rely on the hunting season for their livelihoods.

Spotted Bear closures Aug. 28

This map shows closed areas on the Spotted Bear Ranger District due to 20 fires burning on the district.

I think this latest closure got our back up plan.

News update.

Just to give an idea of what is going on in the wilderness.

Mother Nature threw up a long detour for a group of friends turned away last week by the Bear Creek Fire in the Bob Marshall Wilderness.

“We could see the trees torching,” said Luke Kantola of California. Kantola and his friends Charles McGrail, Clara Hanson, Vinnie Inzano and Colin Arisman had hiked in the Bob Marshall Wilderness down the South Fork of the Flathead to the White River junction.

Once there, they floated in pack rafts to just a couple of miles above the Mid Creek takeout. They made camp and could see the smoke and a glow in the distance but didn’t know how far away the fire really was.

A wilderness ranger came into camp told them they had to turn around. They hiked back to Black Bear Cabin, arriving at 2 a.m. They spent the next day at Black Bear and rested up a bit.

Smoke and ash from the fire rained down on camp, but the Forest Service crew there made sure they fed well.

The next day they hiked out via Smith Pass, 32 miles in one day. Once there, they were met with the kindness of strangers again. It was about 10:30 p.m. when they got out, but a crew from Swan Mountain Outfitters got them food and gave them a ride back to Spotted Bear.

The group gave a big thanks to the Forest Service, including wilderness ranger Rich Owens, and Swan Mountain Outfitters for all their help. On Sunday, they were reunited with their vehicles and were making phone calls back home from Spotted Bear, to tell family members they were OK.

Save for a few blisters and a good coating of dirt and soot on their clothes, they were no worse for the wear. The group has plans to return next year so they can complete the trip.

News Update 9-1-15.

Basic Information

Current as of ‎8‎/‎31‎/‎2015‎ ‎5‎:‎49‎:‎34‎ ‎PM
Incident Type Wildfire
Cause Lightning Strike
Date of Origin Wednesday August 12th, 2015 approx. 01:35 PM
Location 3 miles SW of the Spotted Bear Ranger District, 57 miles from Hungry Horse.
Incident Commander Reed ICT3(t)

Current Situation

Total Personnel 83
Size 67,594 Acres
Fuels Involved Timber (grass and understory); Timber (litter and understory)
Significant Events Active; Crowning; Wind Driven Runs; Group Torching

Outlook

Planned Actions Assess Bear Creek Fire outside of wilderness for opportunities for direct suppression to reinforce point protection priorities. Implement suppression tactics with limited resources to protect improvements and infrastructure.
Projected Incident Activity 24 hours: Humidities are expected to increase although winds will become breezy during the day. Precipitation possible.

48 hours: Winds will become breezy during the day. Seasonal temperatures. Rh dropping.

Remarks IMT3 is also managing the Trail Creek Fire (21,100 acres). The Lake Creek Fire was consumed in the Bear Creek Fire.

Spotted Bear Ranger Station

Bear Creek Fire Update – 9-3-15

Incident: Bear Creek Fire Wildfire

With a cool and rainy weather pattern in place, the focus on the Bear Creek Fire turned from fire management and suppression to safety considerations, trail rehabilitation and preparing wilderness access for the upcoming hunting season. The fire burned through a small area impacted by a previous wildfire on its southern flank, but made little other movement. While smoke could be seen from Black Bear Cabin, the structure was not threatened by the fire’s expansion.

Current and forecasted weather will provide firefighters with a window to finalize containment efforts on spot fires and work on removal of hazard trees and slash associated with the shaded fuel break on the Bruce Creek and Meadow Creek Roads. Selected heavy equipment used during suppression activities is being demobilized, while sawyers are being brought in to handle technical hazard tree falling needs. A trail assessment crew from Spotted Bear Ranger District will be mobilized to assess trail clearing needs, with a focus on reopening access points and trails as soon as it is safe to do so.

Structure protection (hoses, water pumps, and sprinklers) remains in place at the three guest ranches – Diamond R, Spotted Bear Ranch and Wilderness Lodge as well as the Spotted Bear Ranger Station itself. Most structure protection personnel have been re-allocated towards helping with hazardous tree removal operations on the Bear Creek and Trail Creek Fire areas and surrounding access roads.

Bear Creek Fire Update – 9-4-15

Cool and rainy weather continues at the Spotted Bear Ranger District in the vicinity of the Bear Creek Fire. With fire activity significantly reduced and debris associated with construction of shaded fuel break removed, selected crews and machinery assigned to the fire are being demobilized. Sawyers are focusing efforts on felling hazard trees along roads. A trail assessment crew from Spotted Bear Ranger District will assess trail clearing needs today, with the dual objectives of evaluating work needed to provide access to backcountry administrative sites and assessing work needed to reopen access points and trails. Preparing the wilderness for the upcoming hunting season remains a priority.

Structure protection (hoses, water pumps, and sprinklers) remains in place at the three guest ranches – Diamond R, Spotted Bear Ranch and Wilderness Lodge as well as the Spotted Bear Ranger Station itself. Protective wrapping (i.e., fire-resistant wrap) will be removed from selected structures, such as bridges surrounded by burned forest. Most structure protection personnel have been re-allocated towards helping with hazardous tree removal operations on the Bear Creek and Trail Creek Fire areas and surrounding access roads.

Update 9.6.15

Last updated on the Bear Creek Fire.  The area has received  rain and the fires are contained or out. Higher elevations have received snow.

Part 4 – “When the Woods Were Wild”

In Preparation for the trip,  Keith gave me two books to read.  The one I read first was “When the Woods Were Wild ” by Stephen Hawkins.  Stephen is who Told Hunter bought his outfitter business from.  Todd no longer has the business.  The book gives a back story of Stephen’s childhood and how his love of hunting grew into a very good business. The book gives a insight into the world of an outfitter.  There is a lot of work that goes into each trip.  Transporting supplies into and out of the wilderness is a large task. A normal hunting or fishing party would be 6 to 8 people.  Then it would take another 4 or 5 guides, wrangler and cooks to support the group.  There maybe 12 people or more that needs food, shelter and clothing transported in on horseback and mule.

A large group may need 15 to 20 pack animals plus the horses for the people to ride. That is a lot to keep up with.  One thing I learned is that a line of mules tied together is called a pack string.  The other thing I learned is that mules and pack strings have wrecks.  This is why a small rope is used to tie each mule to the next. If a heavy rope is used and a mule wrecks, I will take the whole pack string with it. But with a small string it will break and only one mule would be lost.

The other book I read was by Howard Copenhaver called “They Left Their Tracks”. He and his brother started  guiding before  World War II and continued after the war, some 60 years as an outfitter. He tells short stories of trips and interesting adventures with  guest and crew. He is a bridge from the old west to the present. In fact one of his hands rode with Butch Cassidy.

Reading these books about the Bob and Outfitters has given me a little  insight into the Bob Marshall Wilderness and what to expect.

Part 5 – Bears

The Bob Marshall Wilderness has the largest concentration of Grizzly Bear in the lower 48 states.  The Bob is home to more than a thousand. Though a concern, I am not to worried about them.  I have camped and hiked in Black Bear Country many times with out fear. I have had several bear in counters and all have ended with the bear running away.  However I don’t to sound aragonite or foolish,  I  will be carrying bear spray and a 44 pistol with me. Most Grizzly  Bear attacks happen to solo hikers. So rule number one is don’t go alone, take a friend. That is a hard rule for me because I do like to explore  on my own. I think me and Keith have the same adventure spirit and we can explore together.  Bears don’t like to be surprised, so a group will make more noise than a solo hiker. Rule number two, don’t hike alone, take lots of friends . So that’s two rules I don’t like. If you do come up on a bear and it doesn’t run away.  Try to make yourself look bigger. Raze your  arms  over your head. Hold your jacket out to make yourself look bigger.  Do not turn and run. Back away slowly. We will be on horseback and will look bigger.  So rule three is don’t hike alone, take a horse. If you are charged by a bear, throw something at it. I prefer lead. So rule four is don’t hike alone, carry a big gun. There have been reports of men killed by bear after unloading all their rounds into the bear from a small calaber handgun. If the bear gets through all the lead and spray, and you can’t get away, cover your head and curl up in a ball. Then hope your budy is a good shot. Rule five is don’t hike alone, take a marksman with you. So I will be going everywhere on horseback with someone out of the group,  they are all good marksman.

Along with the Grizzly Bears are the Mountain Lions. I don’t know the concentration of lions but they are also a concern.  They will stalk you and attack from behind  and above.  I think the same five rules for Grizzlies  will apply for Lions.

Next on the list would be Black Bear, Wolfs, Wolverine and and maybe a Badger. Not really much to worry about.  There are no poisonous snacks in the Bob. I think we will have to be more careful about slips and falls than the wildlife.

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Upgraded to a 44.

Part 6 – MovingCamp

The original plan was to enter the Bob  at the Meadow Creek Trailhead and camp at the influx of the Black Bear Creek and the South Fork of the Flathead River. The Bear Creek  Wildfire put an end to that. From what I can tell on map, the entire area we would have been hunting,  camping and fishing in was buried.  The trailhead most definitely burned.  Even if that area was opened back up, the hunting would be terrible.  With nothing to eat, the wildlife that was puhed out will not return this year. A new hunting area is needed.

See post “It’s Going To Get Western ” for the rest of the story.

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