By Trent Tibbitts

One story passed down about my great, great grandfather Madison Green Tibbitts goes something like this: At the age of 18, He was in the 14th Ga. Infantry. During the Battle of the Wilderness, on May 6th, he was shot through the right knee. A silk handkerchief was used to clean the wound by running it through the hole created by the mini-ball.

While in the hospital he was bunked next to a Yankee named John. They became friends and keep in touch after the war. Once he was released and after the war was over,  Maston took a train to Ga. He had to walk a long way to his home in Paulding county on crutches from the train station.

He received a war pension for his knee, $50 a month. For two summers,  he attended Bowdon College in Bowdon Ga. It was one of five Ga. colleges commissioned to provide free tuition to poor and maimed Confederate veterans. There he learned to be a cordwainer (shoemaker) or a cobbler (repaires shoes) or both.  He walked from Paulding to Bowden on crutches, a distance of 60 miles one way. He was joined by Bill Sheffield and A.C. Scoggins. The Union army had destroyed everything along the route, including stores and hotels.  They relied on the generosity of strangers for food and a bed for the night. One such person was Mr. Dyer in Sand Hill. They would stay with him on each trip. On his last trip home, Maston bought a heifer calf from Mr. Dyer. He drove the calf home with a rope while still walking on crutches.  He was to marry Mary Ann Starnes and needed a cow of his own. This was the first new livestock to come into Paulding County after the war.  Paulding was totally devastated from the live off the land campaign of the Union.  Paulding had the most soldiers for the longest period of time than anywhere else during the war. Very little livestock was left.

Maston’s friend, John sent word and invited him up to visit and paid for his trip. John was a wealthy man who had indoor plumbing.  Matson asked to use the restroom. John showed Matson were to go. When he came out and walked back to John, he said, “John I have to ask you a question. When I was sitting there, I looked up and to my surprise there was a nice big framed painting of General Bobby Lee. What in the world is a Yankee doing with a painting of General Lee?”. John replied, “there isn’t anything that could move a Yankees boules like Robert Lee.”

 

 

Some of my Confederate heritage

By Todd Tibbitts

 

In the Spring of 1864…. March 19th according to enlistment records… my great, great grandfather, M.G. (Maston Green) Tibbitts was talked into joining the 14th Regiment, GA Volunteer Infantry, Company K (Etowah Guards – Bartow County), of the Confederate States of America by his two older brothers who’d already enlisted a few years earlier at the beginning of the Civil War. The two older brothers were James W. (Jim) Tibbitts and Thomas J. Tibbitts, and while on furlough back home in Dallas, GA, northern Paulding County, they talked the younger Maston into signing up to fight so that they could receive signing bonuses.

 

M.G (Maston Green) was born on October 13, 1845. Private M.G. Tibbitts was wounded during his first campaign at The Battle of Wilderness, VA, May 5-7, 1864, just a few short months after enlisting. He was transported to a hospital in Augusta, GA for treatment and rehab for his battlefield wound… a mini-ball had passed relatively cleanly through the knee allowing for recovery without leg amputation. (His Confederate Pension Application reads/// “Application for Allowance for ‘Disabled Leg’. Amount $50. Entered on Record, March 29, 1894.” He walked with a limp the remainder of his life while carrying on a full and productive life raising his family and working back on the farm in Dallas, GA. Maston Green died on February 13, 1924 and is buried at Old Harmony Grove Church Cemetery, Paulding Co., GA.

 

Older brother, Thomas J. Tibbitts was born on December 12, 1841. Sergeant Thomas J. Tibbitts was also wounded in battle, just a few days after his younger brother, Maston Green, was wounded. It happened in the very next battle of the 14th Regiment, GA Infantry which was the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, VA, May 12, 1864. (His Confederate Pension Application reads … “Application for Allowance for ‘Left Leg’. Amount $25. Entered on Record, July 16, 1888”) Thomas J. Tibbitts died on June 18, 1924 and is buried at Mt. Moriah Baptist Church Cemetery, Paulding Co., GA [Note: If one looks closely at his weathered marble headstone, along its top line, one can still make out the inscription…KKK.]

 

Older brother, James W. (Jim) was born on June 29, 1837. Corporal James W. Tibbitts served through the entire war, even having sustained a battlefield injury early on at the Battle of Mechanicsville, VA in 1862, and he also stood with General Robert E. Lee and the CSA troops at the surrender at Appomattox, April 9, 1865. (His Confederate Pension Application reads … Application for Allowance for ‘Leg Disabled’. Amount $50. Entered on Record, October 8, 1890”) He later died in 1909. James W. Tibbitts is buried at Old Harmony Grove Church Cemetery, Paulding Co., GA.

 

A fourth brother, W.A. (William) was born on June 26, 1839. William A. Tibbitts moved to Arkansa, fought with the 6th Regiment, Ark. Infantry, Co. H, and was killed in battle during the Battle of Stones River, TN on December 31, 1862. Apparently, he is buried in the mass grave of unidentified Confederate soldiers in the Evergreen Cemetery in Murfreesboro, TN>

 

These brave and honorable brothers were the sons of Joseph Chitman Tibbitts, 1812-1892, who was listed on the GA Militia Roster but never served due to his advanced age. Joseph C. Tibbitts is buried at Old Harmony Grove Church Cemetery, Paulding Co., GA.

 

Respectfully submitted: Todd Tibbitts, Dallas, GA. Son of Thomas Hershel Tibbitts. Grandson of Joseph Holis Tibbitts. Great Grandson of Maston Elihu Thibbitts                              August 15, 2012

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